Starr Farmhouse
Historic Restoration
 





What a Wreck
June 2008


Phase 1
October 2008












Our Project Goal(s):  
We plan to restore the Starr Dairy Farmhouse as a single family residence in an as historically-accurate manner as possible to reflect its place as the original and only Jefferson Park residence at a time when this part of Los Angeles was still agrarian. We will also preserve some cosmetic alterations done by the original family in the early part of the 20th Century, specifically Craftsman period upgrades to the dining room. All systems will be replaced with new materials and all upgrades will be accomplished with sensitivity to original architectural features, construction and use of the property. As a landmark property, we need to adhere to federal Secretary of Interior Rehabilitation Standards, and we also will utilize California Historical Building Code. 
Phase One: 
Our first step has been stabilizing the house, peeling back layers to see how the original cottage was built, and cleaning up the premises (inside and out) to make the property less of a problem in the Jefferson Park neighborhood. See photo gallery.
 
Some Progress   [view picture gallery]
Friday, October 31, 2008
 
Phase One:
Our first step has been stabilizing the house, peeling back layers to see how the original cottage was built, and cleaning up the premises (inside and out) to make the property less of a problem in the Jefferson Park neighborhood. See photo gallery.
What a Wreck   [view picture gallery]
Friday, June 6, 2008
 
Welcome to the Joseph Lee Starr Dairy Farmhouse. Some 120 years ago, this Victorian cottage was the farmhouse for the family that owned this 20-acre Starr/Estrella Dairy (Starr translated into Spanish is “Estrella”). J.L. Starr was an enterprising cattleman who hailed from Texas and, it’s said,
 
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  2801 South Arlington Ave.
  Year built: 1887-1888
  Architect: 
  Joseph Newton Preston
  Los Angeles 
  Historic Cultural 
  Monument No. 865





David Raposa is a longtime resident of Historic West Adams. He has restored nearly two dozen historic properties, primarily in West Adams, over the past quarter-century. He lives in a landmark Craftsman home, the Gray House, Los Angeles Historic Cultural Monument No. 600, which was designed by the architect Arthur Heineman. David has been a board member of both the West Adams Heritage Association and the Los Angeles Conservancy, and he has also been serving on the board of the University Park Historic Preservation Overlay Zone since its inception. He has received a Mayor’s Award for his historic preservation efforts, and is often quoted in publications as an expert in historic preservation matters. David is the owner/broker of City Living Realty, a real estate brokerage firm that specializes in preservation properties. He and his agents use the motto, “Preservation Begins at Home,” and they have brokered the sales of many hundreds of historic homes in West Adams to owner-occupants who have an interest in preservation and who have restored and upgraded their properties.